April 24, 2014
The Truth About Marijuana: Health Risks Trivialized (Op-Ed)

Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum is an attending cardiologist and the director of Women’s Heart Health of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City and has been featured on “The Early Show,” “The Doctors,” “Good Morning America,” “20/20” and other TV programs. She recently released her book, “Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum’s Heart Book: Every Woman’s Guide to a Heart Healthy Life” (Avery, 2014) and is the host of “Focus on Health,” a weekly magazine news show spotlighting health topics, seen on WLNY-TV. In this new era of marijuana legalization, the information delivered to the public often extols the benefits of cannabis, with its seemingly magical properties. But the public isn’t getting the full story, and as states continue to consider marijuana legalization, lawmakers and the public should have all the facts.

April 23, 2014
A new photo from NASA’s Hubble space telescope captures a variety of celestial objects both near and far, providing a glimpse of many different stages of cosmic history all at once. The Hubble image, released Thursday (April 17), is a 14-hour exposure that shows objects about 1 billion times fainter than the naked eye can make out, researchers said.

A new photo from NASA’s Hubble space telescope captures a variety of celestial objects both near and far, providing a glimpse of many different stages of cosmic history all at once. The Hubble image, released Thursday (April 17), is a 14-hour exposure that shows objects about 1 billion times fainter than the naked eye can make out, researchers said.

April 22, 2014
NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T plans a major expansion of super-fast Internet services to cover as many as 100 municipalities in 25 metropolitan areas.

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T plans a major expansion of super-fast Internet services to cover as many as 100 municipalities in 25 metropolitan areas.

April 21, 2014
The Lyrid meteor shower peaks tonight (April 21) and if Mother Nature spoils your “shooting stars” display with bad weather, you can watch the celestial light show live online with two webcasts. At its peak this year — which is expected to happen in the pre-dawn hours Tuesday (April 22) — the Lyrid shower should produce about 20 meteors per hour. You can watch the Lyrid meteor shower webcasts on Space.com via the online Slooh community telescope and NASA. NASA’s webcast will begin at 8:30 p.m. EDT (0030 April 22 GMT) and last through the night.

The Lyrid meteor shower peaks tonight (April 21) and if Mother Nature spoils your “shooting stars” display with bad weather, you can watch the celestial light show live online with two webcasts. At its peak this year — which is expected to happen in the pre-dawn hours Tuesday (April 22) — the Lyrid shower should produce about 20 meteors per hour. You can watch the Lyrid meteor shower webcasts on Space.com via the online Slooh community telescope and NASA. NASA’s webcast will begin at 8:30 p.m. EDT (0030 April 22 GMT) and last through the night.

April 21, 2014
In June 2011, when customers of now-bankrupt bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox agitated for proof that the Tokyo-based firm was still solvent after a hacking attack, CEO Mark Karpeles turned to the comedy science fiction novel “The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy”. During an online chat, Karpeles moved the equivalent of $170 million in bitcoin at today’s market rates - the virtual equivalent of a bank manager flashing a wad of cash in a wallet to establish credit. The gesture - with a sly wink to the “geek” culture Karpeles believed he shared with many of his 50,000 customers at the time, including an interest in coding, Japanese manga comics and science fiction - succeeded. By moving 424,242 bitcoins, Karpeles, then 26, evoked the random number, 42, described as the “meaning of life” in Douglas Adams’ sci-fi novel.

In June 2011, when customers of now-bankrupt bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox agitated for proof that the Tokyo-based firm was still solvent after a hacking attack, CEO Mark Karpeles turned to the comedy science fiction novel “The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy”. During an online chat, Karpeles moved the equivalent of $170 million in bitcoin at today’s market rates - the virtual equivalent of a bank manager flashing a wad of cash in a wallet to establish credit. The gesture - with a sly wink to the “geek” culture Karpeles believed he shared with many of his 50,000 customers at the time, including an interest in coding, Japanese manga comics and science fiction - succeeded. By moving 424,242 bitcoins, Karpeles, then 26, evoked the random number, 42, described as the “meaning of life” in Douglas Adams’ sci-fi novel.

April 18, 2014
By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Two members of the Supreme Court indicated on Thursday night that the court will ultimately have to decide the legality of National Security Agency surveillance activities. The two justices, Antonin Scalia and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, made the comments during a public event at the National Press Club in Washington. They were responding to questions posed by journalist Marvin Kalb about whether the court would take up cases arising from the recent disclosures about NSA surveillance, most notably by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Two members of the Supreme Court indicated on Thursday night that the court will ultimately have to decide the legality of National Security Agency surveillance activities. The two justices, Antonin Scalia and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, made the comments during a public event at the National Press Club in Washington. They were responding to questions posed by journalist Marvin Kalb about whether the court would take up cases arising from the recent disclosures about NSA surveillance, most notably by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

April 18, 2014
By Steve Gutterman and Alessandra Prentice MOSCOW (Reuters) - Edward Snowden, the fugitive former U.S. spy agency contractor who leaked details of U.S. intelligence eavesdropping, asked Russian President Vladimir Putin a question on Thursday during a televised call-in show. The exchange was the first known direct contact between Putin and Snowden since Russia granted the American asylum last summer after he disclosed widespread monitoring of telephone and internet data by the United States and fled the country. Snowden, who has been given refuge in Russia, was not in the studio where Putin was speaking. Snowden, wearing a jacket and open-collar shirt and speaking before a dark background, asked Putin: “Does Russia intercept, store or analyze, in any way, the communications of millions of individuals?” He also asked whether Putin believes improving the effectiveness of investigations justifies “placing societies .. under surveillance”.

By Steve Gutterman and Alessandra Prentice MOSCOW (Reuters) - Edward Snowden, the fugitive former U.S. spy agency contractor who leaked details of U.S. intelligence eavesdropping, asked Russian President Vladimir Putin a question on Thursday during a televised call-in show. The exchange was the first known direct contact between Putin and Snowden since Russia granted the American asylum last summer after he disclosed widespread monitoring of telephone and internet data by the United States and fled the country. Snowden, who has been given refuge in Russia, was not in the studio where Putin was speaking. Snowden, wearing a jacket and open-collar shirt and speaking before a dark background, asked Putin: “Does Russia intercept, store or analyze, in any way, the communications of millions of individuals?” He also asked whether Putin believes improving the effectiveness of investigations justifies “placing societies .. under surveillance”.

April 16, 2014
Mars may possess a stark and austere beauty, but a manned Red Planet mission will likely not be easy on the eyes. Recently, scientists have begun realizing that spaceflight can cause serious and perhaps permanent vision problems in astronauts. NASA researchers are working hard to understand the issue, which could present a major hurdle to mounting manned missions to Mars and other faraway destinations. “This is one that we don’t yet have a good handle on, and it can be a showstopper,” Mark Shelhamer, chief scientist for the NASA Human Research Program at Johnson Space Center in Houston, said last week during a presentation with the agency’s Future In-Space Operations (FISO) working group.

Mars may possess a stark and austere beauty, but a manned Red Planet mission will likely not be easy on the eyes. Recently, scientists have begun realizing that spaceflight can cause serious and perhaps permanent vision problems in astronauts. NASA researchers are working hard to understand the issue, which could present a major hurdle to mounting manned missions to Mars and other faraway destinations. “This is one that we don’t yet have a good handle on, and it can be a showstopper,” Mark Shelhamer, chief scientist for the NASA Human Research Program at Johnson Space Center in Houston, said last week during a presentation with the agency’s Future In-Space Operations (FISO) working group.

April 16, 2014
Study finds signs of brain changes in pot smokers

NEW YORK (AP) — A small study of casual marijuana smokers has turned up evidence of changes in the brain, a possible sign of trouble ahead, researchers say.

April 14, 2014
The industry is currently buzzing over the potential of graphene, which is the strongest, slimmest and most malleable material in known existence. Stronger Than Steel Smartphones like the LG G Flex can heal themselves from minor scrapes and scratches, but graphene should take durability to the next level. According to the American Chemical Society, graphene achieves this strength because its carbon atoms are arranged in two-dimensional sheets. The Lightest, Thinnest Devices Ever According to a study from the American Chemical Society, graphene is thin enough to stretch over 28 football fields.

The industry is currently buzzing over the potential of graphene, which is the strongest, slimmest and most malleable material in known existence. Stronger Than Steel Smartphones like the LG G Flex can heal themselves from minor scrapes and scratches, but graphene should take durability to the next level. According to the American Chemical Society, graphene achieves this strength because its carbon atoms are arranged in two-dimensional sheets. The Lightest, Thinnest Devices Ever According to a study from the American Chemical Society, graphene is thin enough to stretch over 28 football fields.

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